Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket tested: A happy marriage of style and substance

Costing noticeably more than many rivals of comparable performance, we find that this particular TERREX waterproof jacket has some additional strong points: style and comfort.

from Adidas
RRP  £220.00
Hiker walking, wearing Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket with LFTO star rating

by Chris Williams |
Updated on

Ever since its launch in 2011, the TERREX brand has been irritating conservative walkers and ramblers with its commitment to inject some pizzazz into outdoor gear.

We were naturally sceptical of the form and function approach at first, but have come to really enjoy using a lot of Adidas Terrex gear over the years, thanks largely to comfort. Terrex gear (albeit with some pricey exceptions) is for spring, summer, and autumn hiking rather than hardcore technical mountain assaults.

We expected much the same with the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket – a lightweight, 2.5-layer rain jacket that has a more flattering slim fit and comes in some funky colours. However, at £220, this is quite pricey for a TERREX jacket. Many of its siblings cost well under £200. So, what extra bells, whistles, or performance does this particular TERREX jacket offer? That’s precisely what we wanted to find out.

Hiker walking in Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY JacketLFTO

Pros

  • Softer and more comfortable than a regular hardshell waterproof
  • Recycled and PFC-free fabric
  • Suitable for hiking and general use
  • Lightweight and breathable

Cons

  • Fit, construction, and design not suitable for very harsh conditions
  • You can find better value rivals if style is less of a priority

Design and features

Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket hood, chinguard and shoulders
©LFTO

Much of how Adidas describes the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket goes without saying – according to the brand it’s ‘designed for a body in motion’. We should hope so. You’re not going to get much hiking done without some movement.

In terms of technicalities, the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket is a 2.5-layer construction. This means that the jacket has an outer fabric, the membrane, and then a semi layer as a backer to protect the membrane. Many lightweight waterproof jackets use this construction method (it’s the same approach as Gore-Tex Paclite) because it’s also cost effective. The trade-off is that 2.5-layer jackets aren’t as hardy as those with a full 3-layer build.

Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket chest pocket
©LFTO

Interestingly for a moderately pricey waterproof, the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket doesn’t use Gore-Tex. Instead, the waterproof membrane is Adidas’ own PRIMEKNIT RAIN.RDY version.

The jacket has a trio of pockets (two handwarmer and one external chest pocket), and an elasticated hood and cuffs.

Performance and comfort

LFTO tester wearing Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket
©LFTO

First things first, the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket is not a hardshell for mountain use or teeming rain, but in fairness, it doesn’t pretend to be. It has a short hem, elasticated cuffs rather than Velcro ones, and a hood that is neither peaked nor fully adjustable.

Where we really enjoyed using the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket was in changeable conditions on hillwalks and as a general-use rain jacket. The slimmer, athletic fit is quite flattering and the colourways means its transitions from town to trail seamlessly. Peak to pub walkers after a good-looking waterproof might find the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket appealing.

On our test hikes along the tracks and trails of the Yorkshire Dales we liked the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket’s breathability. It doesn’t have the underarm zipped vents that many waterproof jackets have but it doesn’t need them. It feels more like a sports jacket than a hardshell waterproof, which is due to the fabric’s stretch. It’s far less rigid than most waterproofs, and goes some way to explaining the higher price.

Closeup of Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket main zip
©LFTO

Thankfully, the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket remembers to fends off rain well too. As with any jacket with a water repellent treatment (DWR), it requires reapplication every so often but the membrane remains reliable even if the DWR is wearing off (provided the jacket is kept clean).

Although we said earlier a 2.5-layer construction isn’t normally as tough as a comparable 3-layer hardshell, this doesn’t mean a 2.5-layer jacket is always flimsy. The TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket is a case in point. The nylon fabric feels reasonably durable – and proved as much during our three months of testing. Its components such as the zips are equally well made too.

Sustainability

Closeup of Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket hood
©LFTO

Adidas is a leviathan and jostles for position as one of the world’s largest apparel brands. This means that it has an enormous responsibility to be a sustainable business.

We were pleased to see that the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket is made from recycled nylon and that the DWR is PFC-free – the use of recycled and PFC-free materials is very common on Adidas Terrex gear these days. Adidas claims 99% of its products are PFC-free and have been since 2018.

Materials, however, are the tip of the iceberg and companies need to address sustainability and ethical practices in all areas including labour, emissions, and waste. Adidas has policies to address issues such as ensuring living wages for people employed in its supply chain. That said, some industry watchdogs such as Good On You and Fashion Revolution have criticised Adidas for not making sure these policies are actually implemented.

Closeup of elasticated sleeve cuff of Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket
©LFTO

Price and competition

As far as performance goes, you can get comparable jackets for less – even from Adidas itself such as the TERREX Xperior Gore-Tex Paclite, which we’ve also tested. There are options from other brands too such as the Keela Cairn Jacket, which retails for £180.

But, the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket is more comfortable than most of its competitors thanks to that softshell-esque feel. It’s also looks and fits nicer than most too. So, if fit and style are of importance to you, the higher price might be worthwhile.

Verdict

Hiker walking, wearing Adidas TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket with LFTO star rating
©LFTO

The TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket is a reliable waterproof with two standout strong points compared to most of its rivals: style and comfort. The trouble is you also need to pay a premium for them, with the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket costing around £40 or so more than its less stylish but comparably functional rivals.

How we tested

Hiker putting on Artilect Divide Fusion Stretch Jacket
A conventional-looking jacket with some unique technology ©LFTO

We tested the TERREX Xperior Hybrid RAIN.RDY Jacket from late winter through to late spring to get an accurate sense of its three-season capabilities. The testing mostly took place in the Yorkshire Dales where rain is frequent and the types of trails this jacket is intended for are plentiful.

Chris Williams (pictured above) conducted the test and wrote this review. Chris is our senior writer on LFTO and has a wealth of experience both as a gear tester, accumulated from working for one of New Zealand’s foremost outdoor brands and a lifetime’s experience hiking.

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