Mammut Meron Jacket Review 2016

Features

Gore-Tex Pro rather than standard Gore-Tex is used in the Mammut Meron, and it has a 3-layer construction with an extra tough outer layer in the grey areas for more durability. Two huge pockets on the chest extend almost the whole side of the jacket. There are pit zips, and the hood gets good adjustment with a stiffened but not wired peak. Others have more pockets, but the weight is lower than some. 4/5

Fit

The men’s version comes in sizes S-XXL and the women’s is in sizes XS-L. The jacket fits a little more closely and neatly in the body and sleeves than some lower-priced jackets, while it is a little shorter than most of the lower-priced jackets here so my bum was slightly less well-protected. The hood fits well and moves well with the head, but I did get some hem and cuff movement when raising my arms. 4/5

Comfort

The neater fit of the Mammut Meron does mean it feels a little more comfortable and less obstructive when moving. As it is made with Gore-Tex Pro you get better control of condensation than with standard Gore-Tex. The pit zips aid ventilation further. There is a nice soft patch of material at the top of the zip to protect the chin, and the hood fits comfortably. A little extra length would be good for comfort however. 5/5

In use

Those two massive pockets set the Mammut Meron apart as they swallow maps, gloves and hands. But there are only two, meaning you cannot safely stash a map or GPS receiver as you warm your hands as easily as other jackets. A little less movement in the cuffs or hem would be good for scrambling and a wire in the stiffened peak may make it even better. But the weight is good. 4/5

Value

Gore-Tex Pro rather than standard Gore-Tex has pushed the price up but others also have more pockets or additional features. RRP: £340. 3/5

Verdict

The Mammut Meron is a tough jacket with huge pockets that is almost perfect, but some details may niggle. 4.0/5

Mammut Teton / Ridge (2015)

Features

The latest version of Gore-Tex waterproof and breathable fabric is used in the Mammut Teton / Ridge, with its C-Knit backer, which is lighter, softer and less durable than Gore-Tex Pro. Two chest pockets and pit zips are also provided. The hood sports a large stiffened peak. A nice less obvious feature is the larger-than-normal Velcro contact areas on the cuff adjustment. Looks good so far. 5/5

Fit

The Teton for men comes in sizes S-XXL and the Ridge for women comes in sizes XS-XL. The fit is similar to others here, being unrestrictive with enough room underneath for insulating layers. There was only a small degree of movement in the cuffs and hem when I raised my arms, and the hood fits exceptionally well and moves very easily with the head too. 5/5

Comfort

Gore-Tex C-Knit technology reduces the fabric’s weight by 10 per cent, improves its breathability by 15 per cent, and is softer and slides more easily over undergarments. So the Mammut Teton / Ridge feels more comfortable and less stiff than a Gore-Tex Pro jacket for example. You get pit zips to add further venting too. The pockets are not mesh-lined, so no leakage there. 5/5

In use

There are only two outside pockets, but you can fit maps in them and access them above a rucksack hipbelt. The hood peak is stiffened but not wired, so while it is okay I’d always prefer the inclusion of a wire so you can shape the peak if it gets deformed in a rucksack for example. Gore-Tex C-Knit is less durable than Gore Pro so a little more care is needed with this. 4/5

Value

Gore-Tex C-Knit is a lower price per metre than Gore Pro and the Mammut Teton / Ridge has fewer features than some Gore Pro jackets, so its price is high. 3/5

Verdict

The Mammut Teton / Ridge is a lighter, more breathable and softer jacket that is great for most hillwalkers, but its price is harder to justify than others’. 4.4/5

Review by Graham Thompson

First published in Trail magazine November 2015

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Mammut Crater (2014)

Features
The Mammut Crater has those all-important two large chest pockets that can be used to warm hands or store maps with easy access while wearing a rucksack. In addition you get pit zips for improved condensation control. The hood is helmet-compatible and benefits from a stiffened (but not wired) peak, a rear volume adjuster and face drawcords. All that is a pretty good though not a perfect combination as a third chest pocket would be useful.
4/5

Fit
This jacket is only available for men and comes in sizes S-XXL. The fit is slightly longer than options, so it covered by groin. Sleeve movement was good but not the best as I did get some movement in the cuffs when I scrambled but it was minimal. The hood is superb as it sticks to and moves well with my head and the stiffened peak allows great vision.
4/5

Comfort
The body is made from 3-layer Gore-Tex, rather than the Pro version, so has proven performance that should provide long-term durable waterproofness and breathability at a very high level, but if you pay more you can get even better performance. The pit zips do allow extra ventilation though. It feels slightly stiffer than lighter jackets, which I like as this then feels warmer in really windy conditions. The Mammut Crater is slightly heavier than some though.
4/5

Performance
Overall the performance is ideal for most hillwalkers, scramblers and anyone wanting to bag summits in foul weather. But there will be those that would prefer a third external chest pocket that could be used for a map, compass or GPS receiver. The weight is slightly high, which some will view as a drawback; and some may prefer not to have pit zips that add weight and bulk. Would a wired peak be even better? What you get here is very good though.
4/5

Value
A
t £250 you might expect everything but you don't get it all. In the Mammut Crater you get a great fabric and some very well-designed features. The price is better than average for what you get.
4/5

Verdict
For hillwalking, scrambling and bagging Munros the Mammut Crater is a great option, but some may prefer a third chest pocket and less weight.
4.0/5

Review by Graham Thompson
Just missed out on being in Trail magazine November 2014

 

Mammut Crater (2013)

For £250 the Mammut Crater has a lot going for it. It’s made from standard Gore-Tex rather than the new Pro version, but that still offers plenty of breathability to keep you dry from condensation when hillwalking. The fabric’s quite robust as well, so it feels as though it can withstand plenty of abrasion against rocks during scrambles and does not deform too badly when battered by the wind. Get the jacket on and it’s noticeably longer in the body than many modern jackets, making it something of a rarity, and so it protects your groin and bum better. The sleeve movement is reasonably good too, so you can scramble without fear of the hem riding up too much. The front zip is exposed as per the current trend, but the zip is not as chunky as others we looked at and the internal flap is not as well-designed to funnel water down the jacket if the zip leaks. There are just two pockets but these are a good size and easily accessible, while pit zips aid ventilation. The hood doesn’t get a wired peak but it is stiffened, and the fit and movement were very good even when the face drawcords or main zip were not properly done up. For the price the Mammut Crater is a great jacket; although pay a little more and you could gain a third chest pocket, a wired peak and reduced weight.

Weight 563g (size men’s L)

Fabric Gore-Tex

Lining none

Men’s sizes S-XXL

Women’s sizes none

External pockets 2

Can hood be rolled down? no

Side/pit vents yes

Website www.mammut.ch

Verdict

The Mammut Crater is a great hill and mountain jacket for the price, though you do get slightly better features and performance if you can stretch your budget – but if this is your limit it is a winner.

Review by Graham Thompson

First published in Trail magazine November 2013

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Mammut Jona (2013)

Made from Gore-Tex Paclite, which keeps weight to a minimum, it’s totally waterproof and breathes well too. The face fabric is soft, easy to move around in and doesn’t rustle too much. The hood is a decent enough size, although the peak isn’t stiffened. It has a high collar to trap warmth and prevent water running down your neck. The zips are waterproof throughout, with decent pull-tags for easy use with gloves on. Comes with Velcro cuffs that offer a wide range of adjustment, and two really big handwarmer pockets.

Sizes: XS-XXL

Fabric: Gore-Tex Paclite

Weight: 350g

Men’s version: Yes, Juho

Contact: 01625 508218; www.mammut.ch

* Review from Country Walking magazine, May 2013.

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Mammut Adamello (2012)

The Mammut Adamello is a very light (373g, size UK12) yet still robust-feeling jacket made using highly breathable Gore-Tex Pro Shell and with all the key features for winter use. The two high hipbelt-compatible side pockets and main zip are water-resistant, the former with no stormflap for extra protection, the latter with a wide stormflap behind. There is no chest or arm pocket, and no inside pocket, which helps keep the weight down. There is more durable fabric at the shoulders, upper arms and around the lower back and hips for extra abrasion resistance and durability under backpack straps and hipbelt. Mammut’s new hood design works nicely with both vertical and horizontal adjustment that draws it in comfortably around the head for a good fit; and while there is no wire in the peak, it is quite wide and rigid enough to take a substantial battering by the elements. There is no means of stowing it away when not in use however. One nice touch is extra brushed-cotton-feel fabric around the chin and lower cheek area, which makes wearing this jacket with the hood up a very comfortable experience. The men’s version of the Mammut Adamello is the Albaron.

Weight 373g (size UK12)

Material Gore-Tex Pro Shell 3-layer

Women’s sizes XS-XL

Men’s sizes S-XL (Albaron)

Pit zips yes

Wired hood peak no

Stowable hood no

Website www.mammut.ch

Verdict

The Mammut Adamello is a very light but robust-feeling option with only the key features that you really need.

Review by Claire Maxted

First published in Trail magazine November 2012

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First test: Mammut Gipfelgrat jacket

There was a time when walkers just bought a ‘coat’. In due course you could purchase a ‘waterproof’. And then these became known as ‘hard shells’, while their non-waterproof counterparts were called ‘soft shells’. But if you have not quite got the hang of all the latest outdoor jargon, don’t worry, as now ‘soft shells’ are also called ‘waterproof jackets’ – and the Mammut Gipfelgrat is the latest example of the genre!

The confusion does not end there, as the Mammut Gipfelgrat is made from Polartec Neoshell, a waterproof fabric featured in the Rab Stretch Neo jacket back in the December issue of Trail. However the Polartec Neoshell fabric featured in the Mammut Gipfelgrat is a completely different beast to that used in the Rab jacket. The material on the Mammut Gipfelgrat is still waterproof but it’s a heavier and more robust version of Neoshell, with far more stretch and a completely different lining.

Inside all versions of Polartec Neoshell is a membrane that allows a tiny amount of air to permeate the fabric; and while this is not perceptible from a wind chill standpoint, Polartec believes this accelerates breathability – and it certainly does well in this department. The lining inside the Mammut Gipfelgrat is also ideal for soaking up whatever condensation does develop, making it feel very dry even when worn by a hot, sweaty user.

Apart from the fabric and confusing terminology, what also sets the Mammut Gipfelgrat apart is that it’s part of Mammut’s 50th anniversary Eiger Extreme range – so the design is extremely functional to match the needs of the mountaineering and alpine environment. The fit is quite close, but the sleeves are perfectly cut to allow great movement when climbing. The two chest pockets are pitched high so they can be accessed while wearing a harness or rucksack belt, and the hood fits and moves perfectly while benefiting from a superb wired peak to really protect the face while enabling great vision. If you overheat there are long pit zips too.

This jacket is designed for mountaineers, and sadly all that performance comes at a hefty price tag. So this is not a jacket for the casual hillwalker, who will no doubt prefer something that is longer in the body, lighter in weight and lower in price.

But in plain English, the tough and stretchy fabric, coupled with a short, close style and technical features, make the Mammut Gipfelgrat ideal for those mountaineers, alpinists and winter climbers who want the best kit money can buy.

Material 3-layer Polartec Neoshell

Sizes S, M, L, XL, XXL

Weight 788g (size L)

Made in China

Stockist details www.mammut.ch

Verdict

The Mammut Gipfelgrat may be hard to pronounce and the jargon confusing, but use it for mountaineering and you’ll love it.

Review by Graham Thompson

First published in Trail magazine March 2012

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Mammut Albaron /Adamello 2011

At 448g (men’s L) the Mammut Albaron /Adamello is the lightest jacket in our test, and while it is certainly trimmed down to make that weight it still has some great features. It is made from Gore-Tex Pro Shell, as are many other jackets, but this feels like a thinner and therefore lighter version.

To maintain durability you get reinforcement on the shoulders. Like other jackets you get only two large chest pockets and a main front zip, and none of these has external stormflaps, so they may not be the most watertight designs around. But the pockets are not mesh-lined, so even if the zips leak you should remain dry inside the jacket. There are pit zips too for extra venting.

The jacket is quite short and the hem tended to ride up easier than other jackets when I raised my arms. The hood fitted and moved with the head well. It does not have a wired peak but the peak is lightly stiffened so hopefully it won’t distort as badly as a fully floppy peak.

The jacket comes in a men’s version (Albaron) and a women’s version (Adamello).

Price £360

Weight 448g (men’s L)

Fabric 3-layer Gore-Tex Pro Shell

Lining none

Sizes men’s S-XXL (Albaron); women’s XS-XXL (Adamello)

External pockets 2

Wired hood No

Side vents yes

Websitewww.mammut.ch

Ratings

Features 3

Design 3

Comfort 4

Performance 3

Value 3

Overall 3

The weight of 448g is very impressive but the Mammut Albaron /Adamello is not as good as lower-priced options in terms of other features.

Review by Graham Thompson

First published in Trail magazine November 2011

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Mammut Convey

A tidy little jacket, in a nicely fitted shape with a fairly short cut, the Convey is light and airy with a quality feel to the face fabric. The hood rolls away when not needed and is completely separate to the collar. This helps to keep the wind out, although the collar isn’t adjustable, so the fit is never that tight. The hood itself is a bit of a disappointment; there are three cinches to adjust the fit and a peak, but as soon as you tighten, the peak crumbles and loses shape.

VITAL STATS

Sizes: S-3XL

Fabric: Gore-Tex PacLite Shell

Weight: 443g

Women’s version: Yes

Contact: 01625 508218; www.mammut.ch

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Mammut Chalten 2010

The Mammut Chalten uses C-Change fabric, which gets more breathable as it gets warmer; two chest pockets; pit zips; extremely durable fabric; zip-out snowskirt; excellent hood movement. But 850g (size L); breathability does not start to improve until 18 deg C; mesh pockets are not waterproof; pockets are Napoleon style so are of limited use; hood peak needs better stiffening.

The Mammut Chalten is a specialist mountaineering jacket that may be ideal for specific purposes.

First published in Trail magazine November 2010

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Mammut Grade Verglas 2010

The Mammut Grade Verglas weighs 398g (size L); Gore-Tex Paclite; two large pockets; a slightly more durable fabric than some; third small chest pocket; hood movement, freedom of movement in sleeves and fit are excellent. But hood peak is not wired; Paclite does not control condensation as well as some other fabrics; other jackets are lighter and lower in price; pocket access is easily obscured with rucksack belts.

The Mammut Grade Verglas is a good Paclite jacket, but there are similar jackets that offer slightly better performance.

First published in Trail magazine November 2010

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Mammut Kiruna 2010

The Mammut Kiruna general-purpose jacket uses Gore-Tex Performance Shell with nylon face for more durability; pit zips; main front zip gets double external stormflap; mesh lining adds comfort; two hip pockets; small chest pocket; unusual hood adjustment works well; slighter longer body than some. But 722g (size L) is heavy; hood does not roll into collar; pocket access is easily obscured by rucksack belts; hood peak needs a wire stiffener.

The Mammut Kiruna’s good points don’t compensate for poor pocket access, so it’s not the ideal walking jacket.

First published in Trail magazine November 2010

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Mammut Convey

An excellent jacket made from a soft and tough Gore-Tex Paclite fabric that certainly kept out some foul weather. The rollaway hood does a good job but isn’t as deep or as cosy as some; and the peak lacks the stiffness too. The pockets are quite low so can be obstructed by a pack belt, and they’re also quite small in comparison to some, meaning there’s no obvious place for a map. The cuffs are easily adjusted with a Velcro tab and the hem can be tightened and released with an elastic drawcord.

VITAL STATS

Sizes: S-XXXL

Hood: Rollaway

Weight: 420g

Women’s version: Yes

Contact: 01625 508218; www.mammut.ch

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Mammut Ridge (men’s)/Bumblebee (women’s) 2009

The Mammut Ridge/ Bumblebee multi-activity jacket weighs 346g (men’s Ridge size L); DryTech 2.5 layer very waterproof and very breathable fabric; pit zips; hood movement is very good. But hood cannot be rolled down; higher price brings better condensation control; hip pocket access easily obscured by rucksack belts; hood does not protect much of face; no reflective piping.

Verdict: The Mammut Ridge/ Bumblebee multi-activity jacket is a reasonable low-priced option but others are better.

First published in Trail magazine November 2009

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Mammut Longspeak/Moraine 2009

The Mammut Longspeak general-purpose jacket weighs 670g (men’s L); Gore-Tex Performance Shell; comfy mesh lining; removable hood rolls to collar; pit zips aid venting; pockets accessible; stormflap; women’s Moraine has hood adjuster. But terrible hood peak on men’s Longspeak, blocks vision easily; needs higher chest pockets.

Verdict: The Mammut Longspeak/Moraine is a reasonable general-purpose jacket but the hood and pockets could be better.

First published in Trail magazine November 2009

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Mammut Convey 2009

The Mammut Convey weighs 446g (men’s L); Paclite fabric is extremely waterproof and extremely breathable; hood rolls to collar; two map-sized hip pockets; good price for features; front zip has external stormflap. But other fabrics control condensation better than Paclite; hood peak is not stiffened; pocket access easily obscured by rucksack belts.

Verdict: The Mammut Convey  is a good price for a lightweight walking jacket, but poor pocket access, condensation control and relatively high weight are drawbacks.

First published in Trail magazine November 2009

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Mammut Extreme Jannu 2008

The Mammut Extreme Jannu winter jacket’s extremely waterproof and extremely breathable Schoeller C Change fabric breathes better in warmer weather and retains heat better in cooler temps: two Napoleon chest pockets; long side/pit vents; excellent hood movement and fit. But 998g (size L) is heavy; extremely pricy; dedicated Alpinist‘s jacket, not winter walkers’ jacket; soft hood peak; pockets no use as hand-warmers.

Verdict: The Mammut Extreme Jannu winter jacket is incredibly functional, but it’s pricy and specialised.

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First published in Trail magazine November 2008