Vaude Basodino Hooded Jacket (2014)

The Vaude Basodino Hooded Jacket is made from Bluesign-approved fabric, which means the material is environmentally friendly. The fabric is also nice and stretchy and provides a good level of insulation, which makes it ideal for hillwalking. Put the jacket on and it instantly feels comfortable and really hugs the body, but without being restrictive. There are three pockets. The small chest pocket is placed quite high, so if you put a large item in here it does run the risk of sneaking under your rucksack shoulder straps, which is uncomfortable. The hip pockets are OS map-sized, but access to them is easily obscured as soon as a rucksack with a hipbelt is worn, making them rather useless compared with better-designed pockets on other jackets. The hood doesn’t get any drawcords or adjustment, but it fits okay and moves well with the head. As someone who does rate eco values highly I therefore found this jacket rather frustrating as it’s great in terms of worldly goodness, but when I’m on the hill the pockets would drive me insane. However, for the price of £75 you could just pretend the pockets are not there and still have a good jacket, which could be viewed as a better option than choosing other less eco-friendly products with perfect pockets.

Specifications:

Material Meryl Bluesign-approved
Men’s/unisex sizes S-XXL
Women’s sizes none
Weight 569g (size L)
Hood yes
External pockets 3
Website www.vaude.com

 

Verdict

Winner of Trail’s ‘Best Value’ award, the Vaude Basodino Hooded Jacket has environmental credibility and a great price – but is that enough to compensate for pockets you can’t use easily on the hill?

Review by Graham Thompson
First published in Trail magazine March 2014

 


Vaude Shipton Hooded (2012)

The innovative hood design stands out as soon as you put the Vaude Shipton Hooded on. As you can see from the picture, it rises from inside the collar to make the fit really snug around the head and move with you. There are no hood adjusters, so as long as your head fits inside this is a great design. Made from Polartec Power Stretch, this is a great ‘warm but light’ (384g size UK 12) jacket that wicks sweat fast and has excellent freedom of movement for scrambling, some wind resistance from the tightly woven outer and a warm, fluffy inside. The Vaude Shipton Hooded would suit people with longer arms and there is plenty of reach for scramble holds. The thumb holes are slightly large, but the rest of the cut is excellent – slim and sporty – so the lack of a drawcord is not noticeable. The zip is two-way so you can vent from the waist if required, the two side pockets are high enough not to be obscured by a hipbelt, and the small, high chest pocket is a useful extra. The wide loop zip pulls are the best here for use with gloves on. The Vaude Shipton Hooded is also eco-friendly enough to be Bluesign-approved as it’s made from 90 per cent recycled materials and underwent the Vaude low-CO2 ecolour dyeing process.

Weight 384g
Pockets 2 side, 1 chest
Material Polartec Power Stretch
Thumb loops yes
Hood yes
Men’s version yes
Website www.vaude.co.uk

 

Verdict

The Vaude Shipton Hooded is an excellent, eco-friendly, warm jacket that’s stretchy enough for walking, scrambling and mountaineering, and has all the features you need.

Review by Claire Maxted
First published in Trail magazine October 2012


Vaude Cyclone II

A slightly thicker style of top that is great when the weather is a little cooler, the Cyclone II has a thick, fleecy lining that really helps to trap the warmth inside but does add to the weight and bulk of the top. Vaude’s Wind Proof 100 membrane keeps the breeze out and further adds to a toasty feeling. It can be a little too warm in warmer conditions, though. Velcro tabs on the sleeve cuffs and pullcords around the hem help to trap heat further and fine-tune the fit. Although the two hip pockets are a little too low to use when wearing a pack hip belt, they are mesh-backed and can help to dump some heat when you need to.

VITAL STATS
Sizes:
34-46
Fabric: Wind Proof 100
Weight (tested size): 468g
Men’s version: Yes
Contact: 01665 510660; www.vaude.com


Vaude Samur 2010

The Vaude Samur shirt is made from cocona – a coconut-derived fabric that is odour-resistant. It feels less instantly airy than other tops here but it is comfortable and offers a sun protection factor (SPF ) of 25. It’s a good, functional top that would work well on gentler walks and at the all-you-can eat hotel buffet.

Review by Matt Swaine
First published in Trail magazine April 2010


Vaude Micro Mikeli 2010

Plain, lightweight, great colour, almost shiny and close-fitting: the Vaude Micro Mikeli, a 100 per cent polyester top, feels very comfortable, but it does have a tendency to cling to extra flesh so you need to have the figure to deal with it. It boasts ‘Bluesign’ credentials, which means it’s been made responsibly, and has UPF50+ sun protection.

Review by Clare Savage
First published in Trail magazine April 2010


Vaude Thermo Base LS Shirt 2009

The Vaude Thermo Base LS Shirt base layer weighs 189g (size 46); closer fit; light; excellent wicking; very breathable; antibacterial treatment; Bluesign ecological standards; perspiration zones aid moisture movement; good stretch; really durable. But incredibly expensive; cut shorter than some; only available in white or black (the former is not ideal for summer and the latter shows dirt).

(01165) 510660; www.vaude-uk.com

Verdict: The Vaude Thermo Base LS Shirt is a fine synthetic base layer, but it’s a little too ambitiously priced.

 

Review by Simon Ingram
First published in Trail magazine October 2009


Vaude Kada 2008

This soft shell jacket  has huge chest pockets that can be accessed while wearing a rucksack; pocket across the back for biking; zipped wrist cuffs; front is 100% windproof, back is 80%. But 614g is heavy for what you get; no insulation; chest pockets extend to hem so items get trapped behind belts; weird mix of features.
Verdict
An interesting garment that would be useful when biking or for scrambles and climbing, but doesn’t quite excel at anything

First published in Trail magazine September 2008