Regatta Transition Waterproof (2017)

Features

The Regatta Transition Waterproof is a low-priced glove that features Hydrofort waterproof and breathable material with Thermo Guard insulation. It is made of polyester rather than nylon and you don’t get a leather palm, so it is not the most durable option. But you do get roll-tip fingers, meaning the seams are not on the tips; plus there is a good cuff with a cord adjuster. However there is no wrist leash, wrist adjustment or nose wipe. 3/5

Fit

This only comes in S/M and L/XL, so not the widest range. The L/XL fitted me fine but not as closely as others. The lining bunches a little too when you slip it on. The wrist fitted well thanks to elastication, and the cuff was longer than some other low-priced gloves. The cuff cord adjuster worked well to allow this to fit inside a jacket sleeve, but the cuff is not quite so good for fitting over a sleeve. 3/5

Comfort

Regatta Transition Waterproofs feel good on the hand as they are soft and flexible. But they soak up water more than others, which makes them feel colder, so they are not quite as warm as higher-priced gloves. As you cannot wear them over a cuff very easily, water can get in when scrambling too – so these are best kept for easier walks when worn inside a jacket sleeve. 3/5

In use

For more challenging conditions Regatta Transition Waterproofs have drawbacks. They are not quite as dexterous as others, so operating zips is a little trickier. There is no wrist leash (although you could create a DIY option) – and that, combined with the fit around a jacket sleeve, makes these irritating to use. Also, I would not expect them to be as durable as nylon and leather gloves with fewer seams. 3/5

Value

This is a low-priced glove that offers a lot of performance for its price tag, but higher-priced gloves offer further benefits. 5/5

Verdict

If you are not too demanding in your needs Regatta Transition Waterproofs are suitable for hillwalking, but higher-priced options are even better. 3.4/5

Review by Graham Thompson
First published in Trail magazine February 2017