Marmot Super Mica Jacket 2011

The Marmot Super Mica is a beefed-up version of the original Mica, and it benefits from Duralite Zonal reinforcement at the shoulders and hips, which is a particularly neat solution for those who not only want lightweight gear, but also lightweight gear that’s durable. Lightweight fabrics by their very nature aren’t quite as rugged as heavier ones, so to ensure they don’t wear too readily, some brands reinforce the jacket in key areas.
Weighing in at just 256g (men’s L) and packing down to about the size of a Coke can, this jacket is ideal for stashing in a pack. Get it on and it certainly feels minimalist, too. Some of the details have been scaled down to reduce weight, so for example the main front zip feels particularly delicate.
There’s no external stormflap, but there is a slimline internal flap to keep the breeze and through-the-zip leaks at bay. You do get two massive chest pockets, though, making this a practical design for walkers. These pockets are mesh-lined, which aids breathability, but of course it means they might let water into the jacket more easily. There are also pit zips provided, surprisingly, which perhaps hints at the possibility of condensation. The fabric is a 2.5-layer Marmot MemBrain, and it’s a little clammier than 3-layer materials as the printed half layer on the inside can’t control condensation as well as an inner layer that’s thick enough to really soak up the sweat.
The Marmot Super Mica’s hood is a little annoying as it has a relatively large, floppy peak; so while the fit is okay and the movement quite good, there are better hoods around.

Price £160
Weight 256g (men’s L)
Fabric 2.5-layer Marmot MemBrain Strata
Lining none
Men’s sizes S-XXL
Women’s sizes 8-16
External pockets 1
Wired hood no
Contact (015395) 63616; www.marmot.eu

Features 4
Design 4
Comfort 3
Performance 4
Value 5
Overall 4

The Marmot Super Mica is a superb price and weight for a jacket with great pockets and pit zips, but the hood could be better and condensation could be improved.

Review by Graham Thompson
First published in Trail magazine September 2011