Mammut Magic GTX (2017)

Features

At just 1820g (pair, size 11) the Mammut Magic GTX is low in weight, and it’s also stylish on the shelf. The upper is a mix of velour leather and synthetic textiles with lots of stitching, so it may be less durable than some, but there is a Gore-Tex waterproof lining and it’s protected by a full rubber rand. The upper is very stiff, with less forward flex in the ankle cuff than some. The outsole has very deep, well-spaced lugs. 4/5

Fit

The men’s sizes are 6½-13 and the women’s sizes are 4-9. On the foot the Mammut Magic GTX fits reasonably closely with a more spacious toe box than some, but others do feel slightly neater and more precise on the foot. The ankle cuff is about 1cm higher than some others and it fits well, but it does not perhaps flex forward quite as neatly as some. 5/5

Comfort

The Mammut Magic GTX feels comfortable on the foot with no pressure points. The upper and sole flexes a little more than some others, which helps comfort on level ground. That high ankle cuff is also very comfortable. The rolling action of the boot is very good on level ground, but not quite as smooth as the best boots. This is not quite as stiff as some others so your foot has to work a little harder on uneven terrain. 4/5

In use

For British winter hillwalking conditions the Mammut Magic GTX is great as it has the features and the performance you need. It feels reasonably precise if scrambling over rocky ground, and a smooth area of the sole under the toe is great for grip on smaller holds. The deep outsole lug pattern is ideal for gripping soft snow. A crampon with a heel clip can be fitted for use on ice. The upper is perhaps not the most durable. 4/5

Value

For the price the Mammut Magic GTX offers the key features most winter hillwalkers need, and it competes well with higher-priced alternatives. 5/5

Verdict

The Mammut Magic GTX is a great boot for general winter mountain walking, and you have to pay a lot more for extra benefits. It won Trail’s ‘Best Value’ award. 4.4/5

Review by Graham Thompson
First published in Trail magazine January 2017