HOW TO MAKE A GEAR STASH

Stashing gear is a useful way of saving energy when you’re backpacking on multi-day walks – kind of base camping without the camping. Done responsibly and thought out logically, it can really open up possiblities on a route.

Using a waterproof dry bag to stash gear... serruptitiously. Photograph: Tom Bailey / Trail Magazine

Using a waterproof dry bag to stash gear... serruptitiously. Photograph: Tom Bailey / Trail Magazine

1. Think about when

Look at your route. Is it an out-and-back? If it involves a loop are there any points pre- or post-wild camp when your ‘out’ trajectory crosses your ‘back’ trajectory? Does your route involve spurs of ascent up to big peaks that revisit, for example, the same col? If so, then you could potentially save some energy by ditching the heavier bits of your gear in a stash. Anywhere you revisit could be a potential stash area – the trick is to make it convenient for your overnight stops.    

2. Think about what

Stashing camping gear in Knoydart and marking position with a GPS device. Wilder places lend themselves to this technique more readily. Photograph: Tom Bailey / Trail Magazine

Stashing camping gear in Knoydart and marking position with a GPS device. Wilder places lend themselves to this technique more readily. Photograph: Tom Bailey / Trail Magazine

Obvious things to stash are heavy, non-emergency essentials like sleeping mats, pieces of tents (or whole tents if you have a back-up shelter), luxury camp items and stoves (not gas or fuel as this is a fire hazard) – all of which could knock a fair few kilogrammes off your packweight. Non-obvious items include such things as drinking water, a dry change of clothes, an extra jacket and additional food that you wouldn’t take otherwise – all of which would make your day if you found them waiting for you in a wild camp.     

 3. THINK ABOUT HOW

The best method is to use a large waterproof drybag the size of a rucksack liner in a dark colour. It’s worthwhile printing your name and contact number on it, just in case – but moreover you need to ensure that everything inside stays dry. Gear stashes generally aren’t huge (you have to carry it in and out, after all) but if there’s more than one of you, it may be worth stashing in separate bags in case one gets compromised.

4. THINK ABOUT WHERE

Under a boulder is perfect; but if the area is completely blank and exposed, consider another for two reasons: (1) you don’t want your stash to be obvious; and (2) you need to be able to find it again. Ensure the location is away from major paths, and doesn’t interfere with crags or require digging or the movement of anything. If you have a GPS-enabled smartphone or a hand-held navigation device it’s worthwhile dropping a waypoint marker.  

and finally...

We love the hills because they’re generally free from miscreants, crime and all the other things that living in civilisation brings.

But be aware that whatever you leave could conceivably get pinched, so ensure you don’t leave yourself exposed or heartbroken if it does. Thus your car keys, grandma’s wedding ring and that life-saving shelter are not ideal items to stash...

This article originally appeared in Trail Magazine