Q&A: How to get high abroad

Q I’m no mountaineer, but I want to climb something really high abroad to experience altitude. What’s out there for someone like me?  

A 4000m Alpine Peak is something many aspire to... but where to start? Photo: Jeremy Ashcroft

A 4000m Alpine Peak is something many aspire to... but where to start? Photo: Jeremy Ashcroft

ANSWER: ROB JOHNSON, MIC.
A qualified International Mountain Leader, Rob’s led groups all over the world www.expeditionguide.com    

"I always recommend that people first dip their toe in the water with something smaller and with good local infrastructure, and then progress onto bigger and more remote trips as they discover how their bodies adjust to altitude and the routine of being away on an expedition. A great first trip for example would be a week of trekking in the Alps, perhaps ticking off some of the 3000m summits in Switzerland and staying in mountain huts along the way. If you enjoy this, a week in the Atlas Mountains would be a good progression. The food is all a bit more ‘foreign’, it’s further from home in a different culture, you can get over 4000m quite comfortably and the accommodation is all a bit more basic.

"Moving on from that you could look at your first high-altitude trip. Objectives like Kilimanjaro and Everest Base Camp work really well so long as you take it slowly and allow yourself lots of time for acclimatisation. This will get you over 5900m on Kilimanjaro. You could also consider one of the larger Himalayan trekking peaks such as Mera Peak in Nepal, which stands at 6476m and is the highest of the trekking-only peaks in the Himalayas. On a trip like this you need to go slowly, have plenty of rest along the way, be able to sleep in communal, basic accommodation and eat a pretty repetitive diet – and the smaller trips will help you to prepare and enjoy the big one all the more."