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Jonathan_Manning

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Nov 06

Posts: 186

Walking with kids

Just a quick enquiry - do you go walking with your kids? Are they walk enrichers or walk inhibiters? And should we be doing more family-friendly walks in Country Walking (like the 3 best Kids' Walks in the Lake District in the current issue)? Or is walking an escape from the kids, and something you'll only have time to do when the ankle-biters are miring themselves in debt at uni? Please let me know, best wishes Jonathan

 
chrism

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 496

chrism says:

Re: Walking with kids

In the eyes of all those who have children - this is a selfish reply - but I am asked for an opinion - so here goes - I prefer not to have to tolerate children when I go out walking. Yes we meet up/see DOE groups and scouts etc - and that is one thing, but parents who drag young kids along, and the kids pick flowers and kick scree and throw stones etc etc are a pain in the ar5e - likewise - and this is just my opinion - parents who take them along in pappoose things on their backs are an equal pain, especially when they start wailing. Kids have their place - and if a walk has been designed with kids in mind then that is a different thing - like the place you mentioned with the xylophone and traily things for kids to play with/on - are a way of encouraging families out on lower levels for a walk - and I am all in favour of them. But I want to go up Helvellyn, Scafell, Snowdon etc etc and not have a load of scrawling kids, babies or those there under duress around.

rheumatoid

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 131

rheumatoid says:

Re: Walking with kids

My kids are well behaved (11 and 9)and have done Sca Fell and Snowdon with Striding edge and Ben Nevis this year. My lad wants to do the 3 GB peaks before he is 10 which I think is quite an achievment these days. I must say they are less enthusiastic than they used to be and getting them out there can be tricky at times but I keep at it and so do they and we manage to spend some pretty good time together that might otherwise be spent in front of a play station! I think the fact we started them early and walk regularly means they are more compliant than most - they see it as a norm. They do like a few sweets on the way and a good pub meal afterwards and although they won't admit it I think they enjoy most of the walksd. I too don't like my walks spoilt by badly behaved kids being dragged kicking and screaming against their will up various hills. Jon

JohnMac

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 368

JohnMac says:

Re: Walking with kids

I have two very grown up kids but I did take them on hillwalks when they were young (about 8 to 14) after which age they got more interested in adolescent things!! My eldest (now 30) loves all sorts of walking and we sometimes take a few days walking together in the Lakes or Peaks stopping at YHAs. My daughter however hates it. It must have been something to do with her first and only experience of Striding Edge followed by that steep pull up the scree slope to Helvellyn's summit. I disagree stongly with Chris. We should do as much as we possibly can to encourage our children to experience the fantastically wild places this country has to offer away from its dreadful cities, celebrity obsessed culture, TV and playstations. I failed with one of mine as far as walking is concerned but succeeded with the other so I'm fairly happy with that. John

chrism

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 496

chrism says:

Re: Walking with kids

quote:
Originally posted by JohnMac
I disagree stongly with Chris. We should do as much as we possibly can to encourage our children to experience the fantastically wild places this country has to offer away from its dreadful cities, celebrity obsessed culture, TV and playstations. I failed with one of mine as far as walking is concerned but succeeded with the other so I'm fairly happy with that. John
As I said - I have no problem with those who WANT to be there - it is those who are forced to be there, or who when they are there cause mayhem, and make a load of noise and disturbance and show lack of disrespect. Manners generally are something that parents are respnsible for teaching youngsters. As I also said- where there are organised kids walks and kid/disabled walks for wheelchairs on the flat - great. I could get this thread off at a tangent and mention 2 things that also get my goat - those who take dogs and dont clear up after them. I dont mind dogs when they are cleaned up after, and are well minded and behaved - but those who let their dogs sniff others, jump up and roam freely are also a pain in the ar5e Another bone of mine too - is those who dont take their rubbish home with them! Most and many do - but some dont - its those who spoil things again for the majority. Likewise the ill mannered, kids who as I said dont want to be there, and when they are shout, holler, throw stones, pick flowers, trample off paths that have purposely been built to stop erosion etc etc are the kids that give the image of kids as being a problem.

Deepinvet

Joined:

Dec 06

Posts: 170

Deepinvet says:

Re: Walking with kids

Hi i've just cut & pasted this from Trail forum it was too long to write out again, a bit in depth but I think it does the job. Just one thing I would like to add is that we are only looking after the Hills for our children to enjoy, we must encourage them to do the same: Hi how young is really young? My daughter was 11 when she went up Helvellyn last winter in the ice and snow that was challenging, but she really enjoyed it. She seems to enjoy the more challenging walks,the ones with a bit of a scramble to, if it is too easy she gets bored quickly. The only thing about getting kids on the Hills is that it will cost you alot of money because they grow so quick. The sort of things we bought were the cheap boots that had to be waterproof, the make didn't matter as they would only last a couple of months before they had to be changed. We took the children wild camping, they really enjoyed that, but we did insist that she carried her own food water and sleeping bag and anything else she wanted probaly 10kg at the most. We did a 35 km walk last year (over 2 days) that started and finished at Ladybower res and she enjoyed that apart from the last 5km or so when good ol Dad had to carry her rucksack! As for day walks if it's interesting she will do 20km but normally around 12km she's fine, boredom is the main thing. Also make sure they have plenty of food my 2 (12 & 16 ) eat like a plague of locusts they are non-stop. What I try to do is get them both involved in planning the walk, this gives them an idea of where we are going and what we will see, plan the walk then walk the plan, also be honest on the distance the walk is, they sometimes do surprise you and want to do more. You must also make sure they have plenty of fluids about 6lt a day in warm weather (and your'e walking). Ok i've waffled long enough for now. Stuart

toysandboats

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 129

toysandboats says:

Re: Walking with kids

My prime walking territory is the New Forest in Hampshire - no hills, rocks or screes but plenty of enjoyment and some excellent pubs. It is a good area for children, grandchildren and dogs as long as they are well looked after. In my view it is almost always the parent(s) or owners that are at fault. So yes, I do walk with my children and grandchildren - they add something to my walks by seeing things that I miss or perhaps take for granted. I also get personal satisfaction in helping them learn about the environment and identifying animals, birds, plants and trees. David Ward

golden_lass

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 56

golden_lass says:

Re: Walking with kids

My daughter's at an awkward age for walking (2!), she's too big and heavy for the carrier thing now, so to be honest we rarely take her out. Either myself or my husband tend to take the dog out on our own. But saying that, we have taken her for short walks - she can comfortably walk for almost 2km, especially if there are lovely puddles to aim at for a splash - with the hope that she'll get used to us going out as a family and enjoy it. We never push her, and always have to be aware that she may well decide to do a toddler special and lie down and kick and scream when she wants a carry [:I]. I live in the north of Scotland, and we have so much fantastic walking country up here, I really hope she grows up to appreciate it. At the moment we just take her to the local woods for a ramble, and we'll gradually build up the length and difficulty as she gets bigger and stronger. We both find it hard not being able to do longer walks like we used to, and head up into the hills, but it wouldn't be practical at the moment, and we realise it won't be for a long while yet. And in answer to the original question lol - I have kept most of the family walking type features which have been in the magazine since I was pregnant. I think the occasional feature is good, especially for helping people with very young children like myself, who want to get them out and enjoying the countryside - I like the hints and ideas, and I'll definitely be using some of them when madam gets a bit older. And maybe a series of features like the Lakes one for thedifferent regions would be worth considering?

Jonathan_Manning

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 186

Re: Walking with kids

Hi Thanks very much for the messages. At what age do kids start to do adult walks? V impressed with your kids, Deepinvet and JohnMac. And ChrisM - how about babysitting m y two-year-old twins for a weekend? They'd change your opinion of kids. Well, ermm, maybe not! All best wishes Jonathan

JohnMac

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 368

JohnMac says:

Re: Walking with kids

ChrisM - I agree with you about dogs and litter, not only on the hill but everywhere. I have a phobia about dogs anyway but there is nothing worse than seeing people watching their pets foul the pavement / path / field / hill etc and then just walk away without a single thought for anyone else who may come into contact (visually or physically) with the stuff. Disgusting. Similary I hate it when people allow their pets to jump up at you and then casually remark the "he's only being friendly". No he isn't he's being a nuisance! It is down to the owners / parents as to how their charges behave so don't blame the kids - they are being just that - kids. Anyway, in my experience, children you come across on the hill are generally very well behaved and enhance the surroundings rather than spoil them - unlike the majority of dogs & their owners. All the best John

DaveHarris

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 1180

DaveHarris says:

Re: Walking with kids

Walking with kids is very enjoyable. I sometimes just walk with my 13 yo son and 11 yo daugter upto 10 miles in and around kent (hill included, Lake District last summer). They love it. They enjoy the wooded bits, the hills where they play. Just fon't frog march them, enjoy them at their pace and slowly build it up. Saying that i also enjoy walking with just the ramblers, with no children. I mix and match both. Only last Sunday i was walking near Knole Park / Underriver in Kent, i was walking with my two kids up this bridleway, and walking towards us was a ramblers group, some of whom i have walked with in the group - big hello's all round. just rember this - Todays children are tomorrows walkers - encourage them![:D][:D][:D]

Local expert on Kent. I walk to Live
fiona41

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 114

fiona41 says:

Re: Walking with kids

Oh I wish I could get my sister's kids interested in the outdoors. I don't have any of my own (Successful avoidance of pregnancy, phew!) but I'd really like to pass on my love of walking to the nephews and nieces. One of them said to me 'what's the point? you walk, you get tired, you go home again' aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagggghhh!!!! Unfortunately they've got all this stuff inthe house which wasn't invented when I was a kid so they can't see why they should go outside. It's very sad. Fiona

DaveHarris

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 1180

DaveHarris says:

Re: Walking with kids

Fiona41, trouble is there are to many people who just let kids play on the playstaion, gamebox etc rather than doing things with them, its the easy answer to quiet kids. Try taking them on a walk with a park / playground etc halfway round, it gives them something to look forward to, build it from there.

Local expert on Kent. I walk to Live
jay84uk

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 264

jay84uk says:

Re: Walking with kids

I go walking quite often with my kid who is currently 7. We have been walking with him for a couple of years and he loves it, he has cried once ( when foolishly we thought he would be warm in -3C winds) but otherwise he is fine. We have taught him to respect the hills ie not running off, throwing stones etc. now he loves nothing more than putting on his little boots and gaiters that are too big and going out.

sirgabbalot

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 1374

sirgabbalot says:

Re: Walking with kids

A little off topic. Last year I was teaching my 12-13 year olds about National Parks in my Derbyshire small town less than 30 miles fromthe southern edge of the Peaks. We'd been watching a video about uses of a national park, and the role of a Ranger. I then gave a summary about how people can be poorly equiped when they've turned up to go for "a nice short walk for an hour or so" when an incredulous voice yelled out from the back, "AN HOUR? A SHORT WALK? WHY? WHADJU CALL A LONG ONE???" I paused thoughtfully for a moment and mused, "Oh, about three days." Another incredulous voice called out, "Where do you sleep?" I tried not to be patronising in my tone as I replied, "In a tent". This all confirmed the kids suppicions about my being severely abnormal. Seriously it was worrying how few had ever travelled 30 miles to places like Dovedale or Carsington Water. One girl said that she had never been for a day out in the countryside. That explained why she spent every lesson looking blank without any original ideas. The countryside is a brilliant place to stimulate the natural curiosity of children and educate them about their world and how/ why it's worth caring about. Gives them excercise too. Our hiking club now has two members 2 years or under - prams are a great excuse for a leisurely stroll!

Pupil: An hour? A short walk? Why? What do you call a long one? Me: Oooh.... about 3 days. 2nd Pupil: Where do you sleep???! Me: Errr... In a tent!
chrism

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 496

chrism says:

Re: Walking with kids

quote:
Originally posted by sirgabbalot
A little off topic. Last year I was teaching my 12-13 year olds about National Parks in my Derbyshire small town less than 30 miles fromthe southern edge of the Peaks.
Being totally nosy . . .and getting off topic . . where are you? The wife has numerous friends in Long Eaton / Shardlow / Spondon / Ticknall / Borrowash area who we try and get to visit each year. I presume also you are a school teacher or a youth group leader?

fiona41

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 114

fiona41 says:

Re: Walking with kids

Dave (back on topic) it's a bit late for the older ones, they're both bigger than me! but now I'm a Great Aunt I'll have a go with the babies as soon as they're toddling and if they look away long enough for me to steal their pushchairs! Fiona

sirgabbalot

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 1374

sirgabbalot says:

Re: Walking with kids

(Back off topic) I'm based around that vincinity. The small town was Swadlincote (Swad to the locals) Was in the peaks twice at the weekend [:D] Crystal clear views from Lose Hill and Mam Tor - Shame I forgot the camera.[:(]

Pupil: An hour? A short walk? Why? What do you call a long one? Me: Oooh.... about 3 days. 2nd Pupil: Where do you sleep???! Me: Errr... In a tent!
chrism

Joined:

Jan 07

Posts: 496

chrism says:

Re: Walking with kids

quote:
Originally posted by sirgabbalot
(Back off topic) I'm based around that vincinity. The small town was Swadlincote (Swad to the locals) Was in the peaks twice at the weekend [:D] Crystal clear views from Lose Hill and Mam Tor - Shame I forgot the camera.[:(]
Small world - I now know all round that area. The wife introduced me to the southern peak area, and we now live close to other end. Close enough not to be bothered by daytrippers, but close enough to get over there and be off walking in 25 minute

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