Answers

Question

walkswithmagik

By walkswithmagik

11 January 2009 19:12

If I were to sprain an ankle, what is the best thing to put on it, heat pad or ice?

Answer

Country Walking magazine

By Country Walking magazine

Twisting or spraining an ankle is a risk on rough terrain, and first aid falls into two stages – getting home safely and treating the injury.

The first thing is to sit down and check it out. If it’s a mild sprain, keep your boot on for support. If it’s bad (extensive swelling), strap it up – compression bandages work well, but check toe-colour to make sure circulation isn’t compromised. If you can put weight on the ankle without sharp pain, then walk with the aid of other people – but try to avoid painkillers at this stage as you can do further damage without realising.  If it’s excruciating, it’s best if you can be carried down.

Made it home? It’s all about RICE for the next 48-72 hours:

Rest – avoid activity, use crutches if necessary.
Ice – apply ice (wrapped in a damp towel to prevent cold burn) for 20 minutes every hour. Avoid heat – no hot baths or heat packs.
Compress – limit swelling by using a compression bandage. It should be snug, but not tight and you should remove before bed.
Elevate – keep the injured area elevated (above the level of your heart) as much as possible to reduce swelling.

If symptoms persist for longer than 72 hours, consult your GP.

Page

Rate this...

Average rating: rating is 2 (21 votes)

Discuss This

How should I treat a sprained ankle?

Subject

Your comment

By submitting your comment, you agree to adhere to LFTO.com's Terms and Conditions

Cancel


banik

banik says

RE: If I were to sprain an ankle, what is the best thing to put on it, heat pad or ice?

Spraining an ankle could be serious so get it treated fast. In fact the best thing would be to get a x ray done to be sure nothing is wrong with your ankle. Sometimes we get hurt in the workplace. This is unfortunate but if you get hurt due to someone's fault then you could file for compensation.

16 January 2013 09:21

AmitavaSarkar

AmitavaSarkar says

RE: If I were to sprain an ankle, what is the best thing to put on it, heat pad or ice?

Without wasting any time you should see a doctor, a doctor would be able to give you the right advice. When you injure yourself you should contact a doctor. If you leave it on then some complication might develop. Always get the best treatment facility for you, if you are having hearing problem get the most advanced hearing aids tucson service.

15 January 2013 11:23

banik

banik says

RE: If I were to sprain an ankle, what is the best thing to put on it, heat pad or ice?

Spraining could be a very painful experience, it can occur any time so it is better to have a first aid kit with you. Even when you are home you should keep medication, bandages ready at a place that could be easily reached. You should also keep the contact number of your physician and other specialists in your phone. Buying medication has become a lot more simpler now, you could buy medicines including specialized ones like deca online.

20 December 2012 10:15

sarahgoodgame

sarahgoodgame says

RE: If I were to sprain an ankle, what is the best thing to put on it, heat pad or ice?

 Good advice but I'd suggest that if symptoms persist you should consult an A&E department or minor injury unit, rather than your GP. Complex ankle ligament injuries can be disabling and require accurate and full assessment, and management. Also need to rule out subtle fractures of foot or ankle bones. The average GP will underestimate the complexity of this type of injury. 

08 August 2011 20:57

wildbrook

reward badge

wildbrook says

RE: If I were to sprain an ankle, what is the best thing to put on it, heat pad or ice?

The advice here for early treatment is spot on, though you should always get it x-rayed too; but symptoms will persist long after 72 hours - sprains can take months to settle properly.

Having recently suffered this injury myself, the best advice I can add is to see a physiotherapist as soon as possible, preferably within the first week - even if you have to pay. The advice and treatment will be worth every penny. (Note: the first question my physio asked was if I'd had it x-rayed - he said he couldn't have treated me otherwise.)

In short, I have been encouraged to keep the joint as flexible as possible, and to put weight on it as soon as I could. I noticed how my recovery speeded up once I had the nerve to walk again. You're aiming to rebuild the muscles that keep the joint in place, so that you don't need the crutches/support bandage/Ibruprofen anymore!

13 April 2010 21:26

Can't find the correct answer? Post a new Question